Theatre News: August 20 – August 26

Local News

The Montreal English Theatre Awards are announcing their nominees next week! AND you still have time to nominate individuals for the Unsung Hero of the Theatre (UHOT) Award and the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) Award. (via MontrealTheaterHub)

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Hair the Musical is opening at MainLine Theatre this week and QDF has two features on the show. Check out director Nadia Verrucci’s rapid fire Q & A and go behind the scenes at rehearsal with these pics! (via QDFMusings)

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Montreal playwright and QDF member Rhiannon Collett has a new project that exists physically and in the digital world. A very innovative project that pushes, literally, the physical boundaries of theatre. (via SpiderWebShow)

National News

A glowing review of The Breathing Hole over at the Stratford Festival. We mentioned this show on our Roundup last week, J Kelly Nestruck is wondering if the show will do for “Canada’s Stratford Festival what War Horse was for Britain’s National Theatre?” What do you think? Let us know on Twitter! (via Globe and Mail)

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Here’s a reflection on Canada Hub at Edinburgh Fringe, and a few details on some of the Canadian performances happening across the pond. Probably the last Edinburgh Dream Trip fodder this year so read up! (the Scotsman via Stage Door News)

International News

Great piece over at HowlRound delving into the connections between theatre and the empathy centers of our brain. I love the sub heading “This is Your Brain on Theatre”. A good balance here between what we know scientifically and what we know, like, really really know.  (via HowlRound)

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One of those things that we know, is that theatre is inaccessible for many segments of the general population, this article in particular addresses the fact that for many, and the Royal Shakespeare Company is addressing the barriers that keep people out of post-secondary training by offering Masterclasses. (via the Guardian)


posted by Caleigh Crow

Theatre News: August 13 – August 19

Local News

Over at SpiderWebShow, they’re presenting a series on Quebec circus, and the firs two articles are up. I found this one to be the more interesting of the two, wherein the author gives her opinion on whether or not Circus shows in Quebec have been Quebecois enough. I estimate that there will be a serious reconsideration in the near future about the use of the word “nationalism” to describe Quebecois culture struggle, but even so, do you see a Cirque du Soleil show and think “needs more Quebec flavour?” Let us know on Twitter! (via SpiderWebShow)

 

National News

Get in your applications/nominations for the John Hirsch Prize (for new and developing directors) and the John Hobday Awards in Art Management by October 2! (via CanadaCouncil.ca)

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Here’s a look at FemFest 2017 and it’s role in the Winnipeg and Manitoba theatre scenes. From the article:

“When we started looking at producing (Two Indians) we had this dilemma: there are not any professional, available Indigenous directors in Winnipeg,” McIntyre said. “We want to find ways to support not only emerging artists but artists who are lacking in the mainstream theatre right now.”

Abetria said he’s grateful to be working with Ballantyne because she has the resources to help him accurately reflect Indigenous culture.

“It’s great that I get to work with plays that usually wouldn’t be put on just because statistically it is usually men who produce and less women,” he said.

 

(via Winnipeg Free Press)

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The Breathing Hole opens at Stratford Festival. The show is as Inuit as possible! It’s the first time an Inuk has directed a show at the Festival, and Reneltta Arluk is bringing as much Indigenous-ness to the production as she can. Featuring over a dozen Indigenous actors, contributors, and creators, the show follows the life of a polar bear over the course of hundreds of years. Yes! (via CBC)

International News

This story was sent to us by QDF Member Velma Candyass of the Candyass Cabaret on Twitter! Thank you Velma! In it, we can take a look at what’s happening at one of the most  famous theatres on the planet – and there are big changes planned thanks to new artistic director Michelle Terry. (via BBC)

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Here’s  Red Theatre Chicago’s reportback on their Access Auditions. The article discusses the challenges and successes of their May auditions for d/Deaf performers and performers with disabilities. There’s a lot of work that needs to be done in theatre arts in this regard, and HowlRound supplied the scalding hot tea, such as this:

Accessibility isn’t just about elevators and interpreters. If you demand actors adjust their lives to your rehearsal schedule, you may find that none can. Variable work schedules, transportation, and family obligations are difficult pairings with must-attend rehearsals and performances. Are you able to have a longer rehearsal process with flexible scheduling to accommodate work/family/health issues? Can you make aesthetic choices that allow for more inclusion?

The authors really drive home that given the recent drive in arts to be more inclusive generally, without action it’s an empty promise. There is a lot of work to be done! (via HowlRound)


posted by Caleigh Crow

Theatre News: August 6 – August 12

Local News

A look a the relationship between the National Theatre School in Montreal and the Shaw and Stratford Festivals in Ontario. See any familiar names or faces? (via the Montreal Gazette)

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Check in with Arts Alive! Quebec, a touring initiative by QDF Member ELAN, which has reached its halfway point. The festival has two more stops left on it’s tour: Wakefield, September 8-10; and the West Island, September 23-24.  Check it out! (via CBC)

National News

Blood Tribe performer Terrance Houle is bringing his seance-like performance piece, Ghost Days, to Toronto for SummerWorks. Houle has been travelling the country invoking the spirits of the dead, in an attempt at collective healing. The performance incorporates a lot of musical aspects, making use of loop pedals! Who doesn’t like loop pedals?! (via the Globe and Mail)

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An update on SoulPepper’s New York City run. According to Albert Schultz, it was a success! The Americans think we can do good theatre now. Mission accomplished! (via Deadline)

International News

Really interesting piece on Jess Thom, an Edinburgh FRINGE performer with Tourette’s Syndrome performing Samuel Beckett’s Not I at this year’s festival. Really great insights into a process and artist unlike most, and her relationship to the piece. She doesn’t try to suppress her vocal tics at all, the most common one being ‘buiscuit’. Would love to check it out! (via The Guardian)

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A Canadian performer at Edinburgh FRINGE turns the one-woman show trope on it’s head by including Siri, yes that Siri, as her performance partner. Laurence Dauphinais starts by asking Siri Turing Test-esque questions, and the piece goes from there. From the article:

The moments when Siri is stumped when asked about provenance, parentage etc are brought into parallel with her interlocutor’s own sense of absence. There’s an affinity here – however abstruse – that serves to sharpen a feeling, lurking I suspect in many of us as technology and AI leap ever forward, of existential anxiety.

(via the Telegraph)

 


posted by Caleigh Crow

Theatre News: July 30 – August 5

Local News

Looking for directors for your board of directors? The Conseil des arts Montreal has an exciting program that pairs up your organization with potential board directors. The deadline to apply for the next session is September 4th so get organized and take advantage of this great resource early! (via CAM)

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Check out QDF’s interview with Anthony Kennedy of CABAL Theatre. Their upcoming production, Tragic Queens, opens in a few weeks at the MainLine Theatre. The show promises to be a multi-sensory smorgasbord with guest appearances and live video streaming incorporated into the performance. Read on! (via QDFMusings.com)

National News

BC-born Celeste Evans smashed the magical glass ceiling and carved out a space for herself as a hugely successful female magician at a time when that field was dominated by men. She passed away late July, and this week the Globe in Mail reflects on her career and life. (via the Globe and Mail)

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Check out Dark Crop, an all-night outdoor nocturnal theatre festival in London, ON. Audience members gathered under an old windmill, warmed by a bonfire, and watched a whole 12 hours worth of theatre under the stars. There was improv at 4:30 am! This seems like something the night-owl Montreal crowd could get behind. (via LFPress)

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The Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity have a BUNCH of workshops, residencies, and other practicums to apply for. From performance to design to tech theatre, there’s something for theatre practitioners of all stripes! (via PACT.ca)

International News

The Guardian remembers Sam Shepard, American playwright, who passed away last week. Get your hands on one of Shepard’s plays and have a read in remembrance. From the piece:

Shepard could write the great American play and he could deconstruct it, too. His love of Beckett and the myths of America fused beautifully to create works that remain blisteringly current in their wrestling with theatrical form, but satisfyingly classical in their treatment of character and narrative. They’re filled with music and poetry and incredible stage imagery. They’re packed with a love of cinema and rock music but rooted in the plays of Aeschylus and Sophocles.

(via The Guardian)

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The Guardian is also the place to go for all your Edinburgh FRINGE 2017 needs! It’s only just begun but they’ve got reviews, top 10 must-sees, and the classic thinkpiece!! There’s a show about Morrissey, a show about the dark side of Robbie Burns, and of course, So. Much. Standup. Do you have a dream Edinburgh itinerary? Any awesome Edinburgh experiences? Let us know on Twitter!

 

posted by Caleigh Crow

Theatre News: July 23 – July 29

Local News

CAM wants your opinion!Help guide the Conseil des Arts Montreal’s future values by answering a few questions. ‘Nuff said. (via ELAN)

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The National Theatre School is accepting applications for their Artistic Leadership Residency. They’re looking for artistic leaders for a one year intensive residency that will prepare the selected candidate for life as a professional artistic director. If that sounds like you, have a look! (via PACT News)

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A wonderful profile over at CBC.ca on Eda Holmes, new Artistic Director of QDF Company Member Centaur Theatre. We can look forward to very involved leadership, with Eda planning to host “salons” and hold office hours after Sunday Matinees. What has me really excited is the possibility of integrating local Montreal musicians into Centaur performances. So much to look forward to! (via CBC.ca)

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The Montreal Gazette covers a few upcoming shows, including QDF Company Member Repercussion Theatre’s Much Ado About Nothing. You can see QDF’s Sneak Peek here. Shakespeare in the Park is coming to a park near you! (via Montreal Gazette)

National News

Stage Door has the latest on Toronto’s upcoming theatre season with Aluna Theatre, The Theatre Centre, and The Coal Mine Theatre all announcing their programming for 2017/2018. Aluna Theatre’s CAMINOS 2017 Festival lineup is part of the upcoming season – it’s a “festival of new works-in-progress from local Pan-American, Indigenous, and Latinx artists who are pushing the boundaries of theatre, dance, performance art, music, visual arts, installation, and film.” The Theatre Centre is looking for new artists-in-residence! And The Coal Mine theatre is having a Fleetwood Mac moment with a Rumors COAL MINE CONCERT. Check them out! (via Stage Door)

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Who doesn’t love giant puppets?! Similar to the Giants that roamed Montreal for the 375th, the streets of Ottawa have two new features for Canada’s 150th: a spider and a dragon battling it out! Check the awesome video on Twitter: There’s some really great pics and video over at CTV.ca! Puppetry is back in the public arts work in a BIG way this year. Are you glad to see it? Tweet us! (via CTV.ca)

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Every week I seem to post the latest J Kelly Nestruck article over at the Globe and Mail. This week he writes about Kiviuq Returns and it’s an artistically affirming review with the endless possibilities of theatre proudly on display. It gives me hope! Look what we as theatre practitioners are capable of! From the review:

Performed by a corps of unique performers with talents you won’t find south of the Arctic Circle (theatrical throat singing, for one), it has that strong sense of larger purpose often absent from theatre – and deserves to be further developed at home and seen more widely. […]

Many of these tales had – along with traditional drumming and dances – been banned by missionaries and the Canadian government in the past. They were in danger of disappearing – so the “return” of the title is not a sign of a superhero sequel, but of reclamation and decolonization.

(via Globe and Mail)

International News

Here’s a think piece over at the Guardian about Michael Moore’s new Broadway show, The Terms of My Surrender, drawing parallels between that show and the Public Theatre’s Trump-y version of King Lear. File it under ‘how political should theatre be?’ (via The Guardian)

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Some inside baseball – or backstage baseball? – about what goes into protecting the UK’s National Theatre from hackers & scammers. A funny little profile, with subject George Tunnicliffe taking his job as seriously as you’d expect (very seriously but we thank him). An often overlooked or unheard of part of running a major theatre company. (via the BBC)

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Ever wanted to roleplay as Russian political prisoners Pussy Riot? You’re in luck, Pussy Riot have you covered! According to Pitchfork:

Created by theatre company Les Enfants Terribles, “Inside Pussy Riot” will depict Pussy Riot’s “epic ordeal when they were arrested, forced through a flawed judicial system and finally transported to a Russian jail.” Pussy Riot’s Nadya Tolokonnikova, a co-creator, will be taking part in a selection of shows—including opening night.

It’s going to be an immersive theatre piece, meaning audience members will be fully integrated in the Pussy Riot Prison experience. Not for the faint of heart! (via Pitchfork)

posted by Caleigh Crow

Theatre News: July 16 – July 22

 

Local News

ICYMI: It’s still Just for Laughs!! Looks like JFL is teaming up with an Australian company in the hopes of establishing an “international circuit of comedy festivals” that would see the JFL model expanded at least into the Australian market. It seems like it’s being set up as a comedian free-trade agreement that facilitates Quebecois performers in Australia and vice versa. Neat! (via Montreal Gazette)

National News

Theatre in the pool! Have you ever heard of theatre in the pool? I’ll be honest and say it never occurred to me, but I love the new approach! There’s so many possibilities when you have space that exists in two states – air and fluid. Imagine Waiting for Godot in a pool! What plays would you like to see staged in a pool? Send us a Tweet! (via Global)

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SoulPepper Theatre’s New York residency is paying off with great reviews from critics and “serious New York people“! We’ve been keeping an eye on the experiment ever since reading this piece over at the Globe and Mail asking if the $2.5 million trip will be worth it for Canadian theatre. So far, it seems there’s been an increase in interest, and artistic director Albert Schultz seems excited! (via CBC)

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MTSpace announced the IMPACT2017 lineup and there’s so. Much. Stuff. Including QDF company member Geordie Productions, who are bringing Jabber to the festival where it can be seen with a whole crop of national, international, and local Ontario companies. Check out the full line-up! (via MTSpace.ca)

International News

An interesting profile on an interesting performer, Maya Krishna Rao. “The face” of Indian protest theatre wants to incorporate comedy into her performances. Her approach to theatre is very singular, strikingly DIY and solitary. She works in her living room in Dehli, with the furniture pushed up against the wall, and records her stream-of-consciousness creation and watches the footage back as part of the editing process. A new approach! (via The Indian Express)

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A few weeks ago I linked to an article about a group of older theatre-goers who feel alienated by the so-called Millennial generation. Here we have an example of a generational difference going the other way, with a job advert for a theatre company seemingly admonishes all young applicants thus far for – you guessed it – laziness! Maybe have more in common with each other than we thought and this whole generational divide is superfluous? No? Anyone? The article brings up important questions about arts labor – how much do workers have to endure to make ends meet? (via BuzzFeed)

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Here’s a theatre company in Illinois dedicated to creating theatre for audience members on the Autism spectrum. Founded at Northwestern University in 2012 by undergraduate students, the company has been growing and expanding ever since. Click through to read about how Seesaw Theatre is making theatre accessible to their audience members through social stories, adventure guides, and the assimilation room (not as scary as it sounds to Trekkies like me). (via HowlRound)

posted by Caleigh Crow

Theatre News: July 9 – July 15

Local News

If you’ve been thinking about stopping by our new offices, here’s another reason to visist! One block away, Rue St Denis has been shut down for Montreal Complètement Cirque, part of We’re Acting Out, Montreal’s monster street theatre festival. There are so many free events to choose from – go see some street theatre with an acrobatic twist and come say hello to QDF at 2060 Ave Joly!

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The Just for Laughs Comedy Festival kicked off last week! There’s SO many shows, and there’s lots to read about to prepare: CultMTL talks to Robert Kelly of The Nasty Show, The Gazette has an interview with Mike Birbiliga, and CBC has the JFL Awards scoop.

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In other JFL news, QDF Members MainLine Theatre and the Segal Centre for the Performing Arts have shows in the festival! If you’re missing FRINGE, check out the Best of FRINGE Cabaret as part of ZooFest and Off-JFL. If you’re looking for comedy of the sitdown (as opposed to standup) variety, JFL and the Segal Centre have you covered with What’s In a Name?

National News

Concrete Theatre in Edmonton is connecting theatre to their community with their summer drama camp for Syrian refugees. The camp is taught by a Syrian drama instructor brought in by Concrete’s Mieko Ouchi to help refugees new to Canada start building a community and exploring their stories through art, in particular, theatre. (via CBC)

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J Kelly Nestruck over at the Globe and Mail delivers another great read. This week he’s checking in on gender parity and summer Shakespeare shows across the country, from Halifax’s Shakespeare by the Sea to Bard on the Beach in Vancouver. This year, only Saskatoon’s Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan was able to make parity, with exactly half female actors in their production. Nestruck provides a very balanced view of this issue, as usual, while asking the questions that need to be asked. (via Globe and Mail) Do you think theatre still skews male or has the work already been done to achieve gender equality in theatre? Let us know on Twitter!

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Toronto Masque Theatre announced its upcoming 13th season will be the company’s last. Go see some great classical and contemporary masque shows while you can! (via Stage Door)

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Adrienne Wong over at SpiderWebShow asks us to take a hard look at the self, theatre, and shared digital spaces. The most significant difference between theatre and film is the live performance aspect, and so people who want to experience a live performance gather together in the same room to experience it, and this was generally the divide until the Internet Age: When Things Took a Turn. Now we can have live performance experienced in real time, but we suddenly don’t have to all be in the same room. How can theatre practitioners use this new advent to improve on the form? What do you think? Send us a tweet!

International News

David Mamet is making headlines in the UK after it was reported he included a blanket ban on post-show talk backs at his plays as one of the conditions of getting the rights to perform his plays. The price of violating this clause is pretty steep at $25k. Theatre goers and practioners alike have been coming down on either side of the debate. On the one hand, open discussion gives the audience a voice to interact more deeply with a piece, and many productions use talkbacks as a tool for fostering community engagement. Mamet disagrees, perhaps as this article suggests, because the art should speak for itself. For my part, I agree with Mamet, though a $25k fine crosses the line. However, I think experiences should be experienced, meaning they occur in real time, and can’t be duplicated or honestly revisited, recreated, rehashed. Talk backs don’t matter much to me, because I believe the play is the experience. Am I wrong? Yell at me on Twitter! (via The Guardian)

 

posted by Caleigh Crow

Theatre News: July 2 – July 8

Local News

Big news for fans of Blue Man Group and Cirque du Soleil! Cirque du Soleil as acquired Blue Man Productions, hoping to bring the show to a wider audience in places like Germany. These are two physical performance powerhouses! Look forward to seeing what kind of work they do together. (via Global News)

National News

A bold opinion and inside perspective by J. Kelly Nestruck about the Dora Awards which took place last week in Toronto. There have been some problems with the Doras in the past, and a programming overhaul a few years ago hasn’t quite done the trick. Kelly wonders why with the quality of theatre in Toronto the Dora Awards don’t garner much buzz, and posits it might be the confusing categories. How much stake do you place in theatre awards? If a company has a “Best Production” banner slapped on it, are you more likely to go see it? Have your say on Twitter! (via Globe and Mail)

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Is Rick Mercer Ruining Everything? A great read about Canadian comedy and American politics. There’s lots of Canadian humor out there patting ourselves on the back for perceived progressiveness (read: superiority), as the article points out, as a major tenet of our national identity. The article examines comedy’s role in developing this trend. What do you think? Have we established a national identity beyond “Not-American”? Ought we to look to our own damning political problems rather than distract ourselves with At Least Things are Better Here Syndrome? Or is it just a bit of fun? Let us know on Twitter! (via NY Times)

International News

July 11 is World Fringe Day! Here’s an article on howlround.com about what FRINGE looks like across the world, and why we need FRINGE Festivals (whether they scare us or not!). How many FRINGE Festivals have you attended? Tweet us your answer! (via HowlRound)

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Is Shakespeare still shocking? An interesting experiment in the works at the Royal Shakespeare Company. The plan is to hook audience members up to heart monitors and track their heart rate while watching a live theatre performance of one of the bard’s goriest, Titus Andronicus, compared to a film version of the same play, and see if we can measure excitement. (via BBC)

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Not sure how to react to this article from The Telegraph. Do you think it’s discriminatory or disrespectful to target a younger demographic? Would you say that the way older audiences are portrayed is “offensive”? I believe putting on a good, strong show will attract audiences regardless of age. Interesting that this #OldLivesMatter article dismisses all young people as preferring to “hang out” and “snog”. These are my reactions to this article, what are yours? Agree? Disagree? Share on Twitter! (via the Telegraph)

 

Theatre News: June 25 – July 1

Local News

The beloved Dora Wasserman Yiddish Theatre (DWYT) company, although bruised by budget cuts, will still be producing works for another year, but no main stage productions. Being a resident company at the Segal for many years, they hope to be able to continue producing musicals in their future and continue growing and exposing Jewish culture to a broad audience. As one of the last remaining Yiddish-language production company, the DWYT will still be producing works, even it’s in a parking lot, as founder Dora Wasserman used to say.

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QDF Member Camila Fitzgibbon, editor in chief of the Montreal Theatre Hub, sat down with Anton Dudley and Michael Cooper to discuss the world premiere of Second to Nun, a one-woman musical about the life story of Canada’s own Saint Marguerite Bourgeoys. A new musical that fits perfectly in the year of Canada’s 150th anniversary.

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Welcome to ALL the Deadlines! Are you an individual artist or a company in the industry of the arts looking for funding? If yes, ELAN has your back with their round-up of all upcoming deadlines for grants application. Find out how to get support for the government and apply for funding today to fund your projects and make your living art a living reality.

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Luc Fortin, Minister of Culture and Communications, released Quebec’s New Cultural Policy 25 years after the launch of the first edition of this policy, which created CALQ and SODEC, after ELAN expressed the need to include more English-language art and artists. Find more and on how to speak your voice and share your opinion here

National News

We had a theatre awards triple header on June 26th: the Doras in Toronto, the Jessies in Vancouver, and the Sterling Awards in Edmonton. At the Doras, Soulpepper took home 5 awards including Outstanding Production for Father Comes Home from the Wars (Parts I, II, III). On the other side of the country in Vancouver, The Arts Club Theatre Company walked away with five Jessies, and Chris Gatchalian received the Vancouver NOW Representation and Inclusion Award for producing Q2Q, the first ever queer theatre conference in Canada. The Sterling Awards in Edmonton were very good to Edmonton Actors Theatre with their production Stupid Fucking Bird taking home six awards in acting, directing, set design, and Outstanding Independent Production.

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Content warning: mention of child abuse, residential schools in linked article.

Noted Indigenous playwright Yvette Nolan and dancer and filmmaker Michael Greyeyes are co-directors of Bearing, a dance-opera about the effects of the Canadian Residential School System. It’s project that’s been three years in the making, and features 30 musicians, 10 singers, nine dancers and three actors. From the article:

The plays uses the device of costumes to let the performers metaphorically “try on” the experience of victims and perpetrators of the schools. “The dancers keep encountering these portholes. They drop into a porthole and all of a sudden, there’s a duet. Sometimes those duets are repeated in different costumes and we see this sudden juxtaposition,” he says, widening his eyes. “The thing that looked like a husband and a wife in conflict – now it’s disturbing. Because now it’s a little girl and what looks like a priest doing the same movement.”

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A great read by J. Kelly Nestruck over at the Globe and Mail about Soulpepper Theatre’s month-long off-Broadway residency. Excellent insight into why and how artistic directors and theatre producers make ambitious touring projects – with big price tags as this excursion cost $2.5 million – and why Soulpepper is courting NYC’s artistic directors, producers, movers, shakers, and deal makers. A risky move for Soulpepper and we wish them luck!

What do you think about Canadian attempts to woo American theatre producers? As a community is it worth the time, energy, and money to find resources and notoriety  beyond our borders? Have you felt the push-pull between art and finances? Send us a tweet and let’s start the conversation!

International News

Content warning: mention of child abuse, description of sexual content.

A theatre company in Poland’s controversial play, The Curse, has been causing an uproar in Warsaw. Here are the two most contentious points of the play per The Guardian:

In the play’s most notorious scene, an actor simulates oral sex on a plastic statue of the late Polish pope John Paul II, as a sign reads: “Defender of paedophiles”.

In another scene, an actor considers the legality of a fictional speech in which she would – hypothetically – raise money to pay for the assassination of Jarosław Kaczyński, the leader of Poland’s ruling Law and Justice party (PiS).

There have been clashes outside the theatre between religous groups, free speech advocates, nationalist groups, theatre goers and the police. How far is too far when it comes to using theatre to spark popular interest in a political issue? Where does the theatre’s role in politics begin and end?  Send us your thoughts on this on twitter!

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We found this great video via Philanthropy New York of a PHIL Talk with Katy Rubin and Devyn Mañibo of Theatre of the Oppressed NYC on how to make community engagement FUN. How fun is a sit-in really? The video gives a great overview on Augusto Boal, Theatre of the Oppressed, and spect-actors before going into what Legislative Theatre is – a technique they developed and to encourage political engagement beyond voting once every four years.

 [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ppmyyomahkg]

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The Wall Street Journal and the UK’s National Theatre are joining forces to create a global storytelling partnership. The idea is that the National Theatre can provide excellent opportunity to disseminate Wall Street Journal content. From dowjones.com:

National Theatre Chair, Sir Damon Buffini, said: “The National Theatre is a truly international brand renowned globally for excellence in theatre making. By joining forces with The Wall Street Journal, another world-class innovator, this partnership offers a truly unique approach to the development of creative content for brands across the globe.”

It’s not clear exactly what the stories will be about, and the more community-minded theatre practitioner will question the overall intention behind the partnership. Is it a marketing ploy to sell commodities or is a sincere storytelling operation? Should theatre as an art form be co-opted into the economy? What do you think? Let us know on Twitter!

Theatre News: June 17 – 23

Local News

 

Call for applications: 9 Internships in recognized art organizations thanks to démART-Mtl

By: Conseil des Arts de Montreal

Application deadline: October 13, 2017

From January to July 2018, démART-Mtl will enable 9 Montreal art organizations to enrol culturally diverse, newly arrived or first-generation professional artists into a paid internship. The goal of this program is to boost the employability of artists by helping them develop their craft and become knowledgeable about the Montreal arts community, thus facilitating their professional integration, while also contributing toward the development of host organizations.

Organizations wishing to benefit from démART-Mtl must meet the Conseil’s general subsidy program requirements and be able to offer a quality internship in one of the disciplines funded by the Conseil. Organizations and eligible trainees must jointly submit their application file by October 13, 2017. For complete details on eligibility norms and criteria and to download the application form.

Interested artists and organization representatives are invited to attend an information session on June 15 at 10 a.m. at the Maison du Conseil des arts de Montréal, 1210 Sherbrooke Street East. Places are limited so advanced registration is mandatory at iasalagor.p@ville.montreal.qc.ca.

Find out more here. 

 

June 21: Canada 150 and National Aboriginal Day in Montréal

By: Department of Canadian Heritage, Quebec Region

Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) will present Aboriginal Day Live. During this event, a host of activities will be presented outdoors at Place des Arts (corner of Sainte-Catherine and Jeanne-Mance) between 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. and between 5:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. We invite you to participate in these completely free of charge festivities that will showcase the richness of Aboriginal cultures through a parade, songs, ceremonies, a series of concerts, and much more!

At 1 p.m., don’t miss the Deer Family Mohawks Singers and Dancers as they perform the Round Dance, while various troupes perform this traditional dance simultaneously in eight cities across the country! An evening of music awaits you, starting at 5:30 p.m., with shows by the Omer Awashish Band, Matiu and Sylvester, followed by performances by Dalannah and Owen, Daniel Lanois, Marijosée and Sinuupa, at 7:30 p.m. A second site, Cabot Square park, will also come to life during the festivities, from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., with artistic programming developed by the Native Women’s Shelter of Montreal. A number of musical performances and stone carving workshops are planned.

This event is made possible through financial support provided by Canadian Heritage in partnership with the Land InSights organization. To connect with as many people as possible, please circulate this invitation throughout your networks.

For more information about the event, contact: Gabrielle de Bellefeuille (Communications, Canadian Heritage, Quebec Region) at 514-283-5191 or gabrielle.debellefeuille@canada.ca

 

June 27: Celebrate Canada 150 and Canadian Multiculturalism Day

By: Department of Canadian Heritage, Quebec Region

Les FrancoFolies de Montréal will stage Celebrate our Diversity! This festivity-packed day will take place on the Parterre symphonique in Montreal’s Quartier des spectacles (corner of Clark and de Montigny) from 2:00 p.m. until midnight.

For the occasion, you are invited to take part in a huge barbecue and to attend free concerts and shows that will be going on throughout. Bring your own food for the barbecues and enjoy your meal while watching shows that are a mix of world rhythms and dances.

This program, made possible with the financial support of Canadian Heritage, is put on with the collaboration of Vision Diversité, the Festival international Nuits d’Afrique in Montreal, Mundial Montréal, and Mondial des Cultures de Drummondville.

For more information about the event, contact: Gabrielle de Bellefeuille (Communications, Canadian Heritage, Quebec Region) at 514-283-5191 or gabrielle.debellefeuille@canada.ca

 

Swift positive reaction to Couillard’s new anglo secretariat

By: Philip Authier, Montreal Gazette

“Conceding some of the recent tensions in the English-speaking community over health and education could have been averted, Premier Philippe Couillard has announced plans to put in place a new government secretariat dealing with the minority’s issues.” Read more.

 

ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17

By: Quebec Community Groups Network

Here is a pdf copy of the QCGN’s annual report to get you up to date about what the organization does for the community, what services they offer, and what they plan to present for the next year. A great read to know more about ways to get support for the government. Find out more here.

 

Le CQT réitère la demande d’un investissement immédiat de 40 M$ en faveur du CALQ

By: The Conseil Quebecois du Theatre

“Le CQT tenait ce matin une conférence de presse, à 9 h 30 au Théâtre de Quat’Sous, au sujet de l’annonce du ministre de la Culture et des Communications, Luc Fortin, quant à l’octroi de 4 M$ au Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec (CALQ).

Denis Bernard, Frédéric Dubois, Martin Faucher, Brigitte Haentjens, Marie-Ève Huot, Olivier Kemeid et Ginette Noiseux ont rappelé avec force la précarité grandissante dans laquelle se trouve le milieu artistique depuis plusieurs années et ont exhorté le ministre de la Culture et des Communications et le président du Conseil du trésor à doter le CALQ des 40 M$ nécessaires qui lui permettront de remplir adéquatement sa mission.”

Read the full press release here.

 

National News

Inside Out Theatre Launches Program of Year-Round Accessible Performances

By: insideouttheatre.com

In partnership with Calgary companies including Theatre Calgary, Alberta Theatre Projects, Vertigo Theatre, and more, the Good Host Program will facilitate relaxed performances, audio-described plays, and ASL interpretation. Find out more about the program here.

 

Call for Submissions for Buddies in Bad Times’ Emerging Creator Unit

By: buddiesinbadtimes.com

The Emerging Creators Unit at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre (Toronto ON) is accepting proposals for original 25-minute performance projects from queer or trans artists age 30 and under (age exceptions may apply). The deadline to apply is August 11. Find out more about the project here.

 

Stratford Festival and DAREarts Mark Canada 150 with Program for Indigenous Youth

By: theglobeandmail.com

“To mark Canada 150, the Stratford Festival has set up a project in collaboration with DAREarts – an organization for children and teenagers who don’t fit in and don’t feel good about themselves. These kids are considered at risk of not reaching their potential.” Read more.

 

Toronto: Kelly Straughan steps down as head of the Toronto Fringe Festival

By: stage-door.com

“Announced today by the Board of Directors of Toronto Fringe, Kelly Straughan will be leaving her post as Executive Director of Toronto Fringe effective July 28th, 2017 to become the Artistic/Executive Director of Workman Arts. Kelly Straughan took over as Executive Director of The Toronto Fringe in 2012 and in that time has stewarded the organization through a period of great growth and change.” Read more.

 

International News

 

How to build a theatre season: something old, new – and a bolt from the blue

By: theguardian.com

“’ Nobody knows how a theatre season is made,’ Paul Miller says cheerily. There is no rule book, no key to artistic or box-office success. Still, nothing made Miller, the artistic director of the resurgent Orange Tree theatre in Richmond, more chuffed than a recent compliment from a fellow director, Ellen McDougall. She said she would recognise an Orange Tree season at a glance, even if the theatre’s name was omitted.” Read more.

 

Photo Flash: The League of Professional Theatre Women Stages 5th Annual WOMEN STAGE THE WORLD

By: broadwayworld.com

“On June 13th as audiences lined up to see Broadway shows , The League of Professional Theatre Women (LPTW), a not-for- profit organization promoting visibility and increased opportunities for women in the field, held their 5th Annual Equality March through Times Square advocating for gender parity.” Read more.

 

This Month in Theatre History

By: americantheatre.org

“From the first theatre in North America to the birth of Margo Jones’s Theatre ’47 and VASTA’s first conference, June was a hot month for theatrical milestones.” Read more.